Saturday, May 3, 2014

Page 243

Assigned reading (1 par [] plus 206 notes) [secondary] [McH] [*]





FDV: "wronged by whomsoever. and whenceforward terrified of mountains?"

2DV: "come into the pictures {factory fresh} wronged by whomsoever. he take rap for that {early} party. and whenceforward Ani Mama and her forty bustles terrified of mountains? but would wave her hat to the papal legate on account of all he quaqueduxed."



mysteries:

[06:47-08:27]

[The languages of Finnegans Wake]

85 languages tallied by Fweet

FW pages per chapter: (I.1-27, I.2-18, I.3-27, I.4-29, I.5-22, I.6-43, I.7-27, I.8-21, II.1-41, II.2-49, II.3-74, II.4-18, III.1-26, III.2-45, III.3-81, III.4-36, IV-36)

by percentage: (I.1-4%, I.2-3%, I.3-4%, I.4-5%, I.5-4%, I.6-7%, I.7-4%, I.8-3%, II.1-7%, II.2-8%, II.3-12%, II.4-3%, III.1-4%, III.2-7%, III.3-13%, III.4-6%, IV-6%)


language (fweet-cites) (chapters)

Akkadian (fweet-1) (I.3)
Old Danish (fweet-1) (II.1)
Wendish (Sorbian) (fweet-1) (III.1)

Bengali (fweet-1) (III.2)
Senegalese (Wolof) (fweet-1) (III.2)

Amharic (fweet-1) (III.3)
Annamese (fweet-1) (III.3)
Assyrian (C8-C5 B.C.) (fweet-1) (III.3)
Siamese (fweet-1) (III.3)

Lettish (fweet-2) (I.1, III.3)
Elamite (fweet-2) (I.5, I.6)
Mordvin (a Finno-Ugric language) (fweet-2) (I.6-2)Ostiak (a Finno-Ugric language) (fweet-2) (I.6-2)
Aramaic (fweet-2) (I.7, II.3)
Flemish (fweet-2) (III.1, III.4)
Cambodian (fweet-2) (III.2, III.3)
Laotian (fweet-2) (III.2, III.3)
Estonian (fweet-3)
Mon Khmer (fweet-3)
Samoan (fweet-3)

Ido (an artificial language) (fweet-5)
Selkup Samoyed (a Finno-Ugric language) (fweet-5)
Slovenian (fweet-5)
Ainu (original language of Japan) (fweet-6)
Santali (Samtal) (fweet-6)
Yiddish (fweet-6)
Old Icelandic (fweet-7)

Landsmaal (fweet-9)

Old French (fweet-12)
Bearlagair Na Saer (a secret language of Ireland) (fweet-13) (II.1-13)
Low Latin (fweet-13)

Burmese (fweet-15)
Afrikaans (fweet-17)
Amaro (Italian underworld slang & craftsmen's cant) (fweet-17) (II.1-16, II.3-1)

Esperanto (an artificial language) (fweet-20) (I.1-4, I.2-2, I.3-2, I.4-0, I.5-0, I.6-2, I.7-0, I.8-0, II.1-0, II.2-0, II.3-0, II.4-0, III.1-0, III.2-1, III.3-1, III.4-7, IV-1)

Rumanian (fweet-21)
Volap├╝k (an artificial language) (fweet-21) (I.1-0, I.2-12, I.3-2, I.4-0, I.5-0, I.6-0, I.7-0, I.8-0, II.1-2, II.2-0, II.3-0, II.4-0, III.1-4, III.2-1, III.3-0, III.4-0, IV-0)

Serbo-Croatian (fweet-24)
Middle English (see also Old English) (fweet-27)
Hindustani (fweet-28)

Beche-la-Mar (Melanesian pidgin) (fweet-32) (I.1-1, I.2-1, I.3-2, I.4-0, I.5-0, I.6-0, I.7-0, I.8-0, II.1-7, II.2-12, II.3-5, II.4-0, III.1-0, III.2-0, III.3-0, III.4-0, IV-4)

Modern Greek (fweet-32)
Old English (fweet-33)

Turkish (fweet-33)
Shelta (a secret language of Ireland) (fweet-35) (I.1-0, I.2-0, I.3-1, I.4-2, I.5-2, I.6-3, I.7-0, I.8-0, II.1-6, II.2-3, II.3-16, II.4-1, III.1-0, III.2-0, III.3-1, III.4-0, IV-0)


Icelandic (see also Old Icelandic) (fweet-35)
Bog Latin (a secret language of Ireland) (fweet-37) (I.1-0, I.2-0, I.3-0, I.4-2, I.5-0, I.6-0, I.7-0, I.8-0, II.1-31, II.2-1, II.3-3, II.4-0, III.1-0, III.2-0, III.3-0, III.4-0, IV-0)

Old Norse (fweet-37)

Basque (fweet-40)
Bulgarian (fweet-42)
Kiswahili or Kisuahili (a Bantu language) (fweet-46)
Gipsy (fweet-47)
Ruthenian (Ukrainian) (fweet-51)
Persian (fweet-52)
Lithuanian (fweet-56)
Cornish (fweet-57)

Breton (fweet-62)
Arabic (fweet-69)
Malay (fweet-71)
Albanian  (fweet-76)
Rhaeto-Romanic (Roumansch) (fweet-79)

Hungarian (a Finno-Ugric language) (fweet-84)
Polish (fweet-85)
Japanese (fweet-86)
Proven├žal (fweet-89)
Sanskrit (fweet-89)
Finnish (a Finno-Ugric language) (fweet-98)

Welsh (fweet-103)
Chinese (fweet-108)
Swedish (fweet-126)
Armenian (Eastern dialect approximation; d=t, g=k, i=y, u=ou) (fweet-132)
Czech (fweet-135)
Portuguese (fweet-158)

Spanish (fweet-220) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)

Hebrew (fweet-249) (I.1-34, I.2-22, I.3-4, I.4-4, I.5-12, I.6-10, I.7-9, I.8-3, II.1-49, II.2-13, II.3-22, II.4-3, III.1-13, III.2-10, III.3-22, III.4-9, IV-12)

Russian (fweet-379) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)

Norwegian (see also Landsmaal and Old Norse) (fweet-582) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)

Greek (see also Modern Greek) (fweet-782) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)

Danish (see also Old Danish) (fweet-983) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)


Dutch (see also Afrikaans and Flemish) (fweet-1123) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)

Irish (modern spelling) (fweet-1251) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)

Italian (see also Amaro) (fweet-1379) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)

French (see also Old French) (fweet-2445) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)

Latin (see also Low Latin) (fweet-2642) (I.1-, I.2-, I.3-, I.4-, I.5-, I.6-, I.7-, I.8-, II.1-, II.2-, II.3-, II.4-, III.1-, III.2-, III.3-, III.4-, IV-)

German (fweet-3723) (I.1-204, I.2-59, I.3-193, I.4-195, I.5-102, I.6-233, I.7-100, I.8-120, II.1-356, II.2-287, II.3-503, II.4-38, III.1-174, III.2-175, III.3-593, III.4-195, IV-196)

Friday, May 2, 2014

Page 242

Assigned reading (2/2 pars [] plus 212 notes) [secondary] [McH] [*]



(what do Swedenborg, Confucius, and Lewis Carroll have in common? living to great age?)

Swedenborg bio "last great change... Assessor... black velvet... teeth... eighty-one... buckle"




The 'Lane pictures' are several dozen modern masterpieces collected by Hugh Lane between 1900 and 1915. Lane was seven years older than Joyce, the nephew of Lady Gregory (and thus half-Persse). He battled to donate them to a museum in Dublin. (p79)

"parks... gun" [EB11]

"one 18 to one 18 biss" time interval? space interval? age??

"Old grand tuttut toucher up of young poetographies" (note that Carroll himself disapproved-- tut tut!-- of 'photoshopping' and most likely also of taking sexual liberties with his young girl friends, and maybe of their attempting to portray him in words or sketches) [*]

♬ It's Your Last Trip, Titanic, Fare You Well [pdf]

The Woman Who Did (has a baby without marrying)


FDV: "this Mr. Neelsoen highly accurrect in his everythinks live here in black velvet sidden mangy years and got a baybay bucktooth coming on at 81. That why all parks up cited about his gunnfadder. That why he man with two purses agitating his theopot with walkabout shake from one 18 to one 18 bis. Old grand toucher up of your poetographies and he turn round quick red if some make one noise. A fact. True bill. And his By a jury of matrons. And his thing went the whole way up Suffogate Street. But who comes yond with pire on poletop? He who relights the moon. and the hag they call Coverfew hists from her lane. And haste 'tis time for bairn to hame. Da'mselle's, we comeho to roo. Helpmeat too, he tell princes of the age about. who not knows she early"


2DV: "this Heer assassor Neelsoen lasting {laslast} great change of retiring family buckle highly accurrect in his everythinks live with howthhold {of} number seven in black velvet sidden mangy yaars and got a baybay bucktooth coming on ever so nursely at 81. That why all parks up excited about his gunnfadder. That why he man with two purses agitating his theopot with wokkleabout shake rather uncoherend from one 18 to one 18 bis. Old grand tut tut toucher up of your poetographies and he turn round quick red allmaidishly if some make one noise. A fact. True bill. By a jury of matrons. And his thing went the whole way up Suffogate Street. But who comes yond with pire on poletop? He who relights the moon. And the hag they damename Coverfew hists from her lane. And haste 'tis time for bairn to hame. chickchilds' comeho to roo. Comehome to roo as chickchilds do. Helpmeat too, his fiery goos goss goosemother, {woman who did,} he tell princes of the age about. who not knows she when first"



mysteries: one 18

[04:52-06:47]

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Page 241

Assigned reading (1 par [] plus 202 notes) [secondary] [McH] [*]





FDV: "Big dumm crumm he offering barley zuck{ers} in presents of maidinelles {maidineats}. Other accuse about him all tommy rotkins. In his contrary"



mysteries:

[03:03-04:52]

[The songs of Percy French in Finnegans Wake]

1854-1920 [wiki] [site] [art] [50min] [8min ♬] [30min] [15min] [mudcat] [playlist-84] [playlist-16]

296.F01 "Parsee ffrench for the upholdsterer would be delightered."
495.03 "skirriless ballets in Parsee Franch"


"Phil the Fluther's Ball" [fweet-23] [] []

"Slattery's Mounted Fut" (1889) [fweet-8] [lyrics] []

"Are Ye Right There Michael?" (1897) [] []
066.21 Will it bright upon us, nightle, and we plunging to our plight? Well, it might now, mircle, so it light.
296.13 Are you right there, Michael, are you right? Do you think you can hold on by sitting tight? Well, of course, it's awful angelous. Still I don't feel it's so dangelous. Ay, I'm right here, Nickel, and I'll write.

"Drumcolligher" [lyrics]
176.09 There is Oneyone's House in Dreamcolohour
540.09 Do Drumcollogher whatever you do!

"Whistlin' Phil McHugh" [lyrics] [lyrics] [lyrics] [] []
050.33 When Phishlin Phil wants throws his lip 'tis pholly to be fortuneflouting

"Mick's Hotel" [lyrics]
050.34 whoever's gone to Mix Hotel by the salt say water there's nix to nothing we can do for he's never again to sea.

"Andy McElroe" 1888 [lyrics] []
292.F03 Bussmullah, cried Lord Wolsley, how me Aunty Mag'll row!

"The Night that Miss Cooney Eloped" [lyrics]
330.17 when the Cap and Miss Coolie were roped

"Abdul Abulbul Amir" (1877) [lyrics] [] [] []
355.10 Abdul Abulbul Amir or Ivan Slavansky Slavar

"Come Back Paddy Reilly to Ballyjamesduff" (1912) [] []
485.15 Come back, baddy wrily, to Bullydamestough! Cum him, buddy rowly, with me!

"Mat Hannigan's Aunt" (1892) [lyrics]
245.05 With help of Hanoukan's lamp.
U3.201 Then here's a health to Mulligan's aunt / And I'll tell you the reason why. / She always kept things decent in / The Hannigan famileye.


"The Mountains of Mourne" (1896) [wiki] [] [] [] [3min] [cf ♬]

"When Erin Wakes" (1900) [lyrics]

"McBreen's Heifer" [lyrics] []

The Fortunes of Finnegan

Mulligan's Masquerade [lyrics]

Jim Wheelahan's Automobeel

Eileen Oge (The Pride of Petravore) [lyrics] [lyrics] []

Donegan's Daughter [lyrics]

Father O'Callaghan [lyrics] []

"Larry Mick McGarry" (1915) [lyrics]

Gortnamona [lyrics] [lyrics] [] []

Song of William, Inspector of Drains [lyrics]

An Irish Mother? [lyrics] []

The Queen's After-Dinner Speech? [2min]

The Four Farrellys [lyrics] []

The Valley of Dunloe [lyrics]

Galloping Hogan [lyrics]

The Road to Ballybay [lyrics]

Later On [lyrics] [lyrics]

Sweet Marie [lyrics]

Rafferty's Racin' Mare [lyrics]

The Hoodoo

"The Oklahoma Rose" (1910) [lyrics]

Fighting McGuire [lyrics]

The Girl on a Big Black Mare

Little Brigid Flynn [lyrics]

Maguire's Motor Bike

No More of Yer Golfin' for Me

The Darlin' Girl from Clare [lyrics]

Pretendy Land, 1907

Mrs Brady

The Mary Ann McHugh

The Kerry Courting, 1909

A Sailor Courted a Farmer's Daughter (parody of the folk song)

Tullinahaw, 1910

The Emigrants's Letter, 1910 (Cutting the Corn in Creeslough)

Kitty Gallagher

Flanagan's Flying Machine, 1911

Who said the Hook never Hurted the Worms?

I Fought a Fierce Hyena

The Killyran Wrackers, 1914

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Page 240

Assigned reading (1+ par [] plus 201 notes) [secondary] [McH] [*]





FDV: "you. And you wonna make one of our micknick party. For poor Glugger was dazed and late in his crave, i.e., laid in his grave. But low, boys, low he rises, shrivering. He be good. He relation belong this remarkable man. Intrance on back. Most open on the laydays. He possible to look joyfull out of smily blue eyes. Not true his portmanteau filled potatowards."

2DV: "you. And you wonna make one of our micknick party. For poor Glugger was dazed and late in his crave, ayhe {ay he}, laid in his grave. But low, boys, low he rises, shrivering. He be good. He relation belong this remarkable man. Intrance on back. Most open on the laydays. He possible to look joylike out of smily blue eyes. Not true his portmanteau filled potatowards."



mysteries:

[01:05-03:03]

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Page 239

Assigned reading (1 2/2 pars [] plus 169 notes) [secondary] [McH] [*]





FDV: "please kindly communicake with the original sinse we are only learning how to burgeon. It was milliems of centiments dead lost or mislaid on them but we can change in the bite of a napple so long as we can see your quick. Behose, our handmades for the lured! To these nunce we are yours in ammatures but well come that day we shall ope to be ores. No more hoaxites! No more gifting in memnage! Highttime is up: be it down into us according! When there shall be votes for vermin as full as feeds for the fett, eat on hearth as there's hot in oven. When every litty of a scolderymaid shall hold every yardscullion's right to stimm uprecht for himsoever, whetter in privates, whatter in publics. And when all us romance catholeens shall have all amanseprated. And the world is maidfree. So tell Coquette to tell Cockette to teach Connie Curley to touch Cattie Hare and tap Carminia to tip La Cherie though where the diggings he dwells amongst us here's nobody knows save Mary. Whyfor we go round ringing hands in hands in gyrogyrorondo. These bright elects they were waltzing up their willside with their princesome handsome angeline chief while in those wherebus there wont helds way oaths and screams and bawley groans with a belchybubhub and a hellabelow bedemmed and bediabbled the arimaining lucisphere. Lonedom's breach lay foulend up incouth not be brooched by punns and reedles. Yet the ring gayed rund rorosily with a drat you for a brat"

2DV: "please kindly communicake with the original sinse we are only yearning how to burgeon. It was milliems of centiments dead lost or mislaid on them bub we can change in the bite of a napple so long as we can see your quick. Behose, our handmades to the lured! To these nunce we are yours in ammatures but well come that day we shall ope to be ores. No more hoaxites! No more gifting in memnage! Highttime is up: be it down into outs according! When there shall be foods for vermin as full as feeds for the fett, eat on hearth as there's hot in oven. When every Klitty of a scolderymaid shall hold every yardscullion's right to stimm her uprecht for himsoever, whetter on privates, whatter in publics. And when once us romance catholeens shall have all amanseprated. And the world is maidfree. So tell Coquette to tell Cockette to teach Connie Curley to touch Cattie Hare and tap Carminia to tip La Cherie though where the diggings he dwells amongst us here's nobody knows save Mary. Whyfor we go ringing hands in hands in gyrogyrorondo. These bright elects they were waltzing up their willside with their princesome handsome angeline chipff {chiuff} while in those wherebus there wont helds way oaths and screams and bawley groans with a belchybubhub and a hellabelow bedemmed and bediabbled the arimaining lucisphere. Lonedom's breach lay foulend up incouth not be brooched by punns and reedles. Yet the ring gayed rund rorosily with a drat you for a brat"



mysteries:

[09:08-09:53]
[00:00-01:05]

[Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's "The House by the Churchyard" in Finnegans Wake]

[fweet-40] [wiki]
213.01 Lefanu (Sheridan's)
265.04 the loftleaved elm Lefanunian

etexts: [1pg] [html chapters] [1861] [1863] [CELT] [reprint]

References have been found in every FW chapter except: I.6, II.4, and III.3. The richest are in II.2 (9), then II.1 (8) and II.3 (4). We can speculate that he added them all at the same time, late in the process of composition. (Contrast his adding all Moore's song titles?)


"The House by the Churchyard"

034.08 the old house for the chargehard
096.07 the old house by the churpelizod
213.01 Lefanu (Sheridan's) old House by the Coachyard
221.15 whouse be the churchyard
245.36 De oud huis bij de kerkegaard.
454.36 No petty family squabbles Up There nor homemade hurricanes in our Cohortyard
621.34 In the church by the hearseyard.

205.25 Phoenix Tavern
265.08 the phoenix
321.16 in the Phoenix!
(ambiguous) Phoenix Tavern: pub in Chapelizod mentioned 50 times

025.14 in the Salmon
prologue: The Salmon House

265.04 the loftleaved elm Lefanunian
293.15 the Great Ulm
prologue: "One glance, however, before you go, you will vouchsafe at the village tree—that stalworth elm. It has not grown an inch these hundred years. It does not look a day older than it did fifty years ago"

299.27 be the powers of Moll Kelly
425.12 by the power of blurry wards
prologue: "'Be the powers o' war! here's a battered head-piece for yez,' said young Tim Moran, who had picked up the cranium, and was eyeing it curiously, turning it round the while. 'Show it here, Tim;' 'let me look,' cried two or three neighbours, getting round as quickly as they could. 'Oh! murdher;' said one. 'Oh! be the powers o' Moll Kelly!' cried another. 'Oh! bloody wars!' exclaimed a third."

246.07 In thundercloud periwig.
prologue: 'a thunder-cloud periwig'

181.26 lyow why a stunk
Lowe, Hyacynth O'Flaherty, Sturk

183.05 your brass castle or your tyled house in ballyfermont?
Dangerfield lives in the Brass Castle, Mervyn in the Tyled House in Ballyfermot

017.14 from sturk to finnic
Doctor Sturk

027.23 Ezekiel Irons
Zekiel Irons

034.09 Roche Haddocks off Hawkins Street. Lowe, you blondy
Father Roach: a parish priest
Oliver Lowe: a magistrate

080.08 that dangerfield circling butcherswood where fireworker oh flaherty engaged a nutter of castlemallards and ah for archer stunned 's turk, all over which fossil footprints, bootmarks
Mr Dangerfield stuns Dr Sturk in Butcher's Wood
Mr Nutter, Lord Castlemallard's agent, fights an abortive duel with Lt Hyacinth 'Fireworker' O'Flaherty
ch53: drawing of a footprint left by Nutter's boot at the scene of a murder

219.19 the Ballymooney Bloodriddon Murther by Bluechin Blackdillain
a man near Ballymooney, Was guilty of a deed o' blood
Blue Chin
Black Dillon

ch1 (begins): "A.D. 1767"
035.24    K. O. Sempatrick's Day and the fenian rising)
[Saint Patrick's Day, 17 March (17) + Fenian Rising, 1867 (67) = 1767]
072.20 Kimmage Outer 17.67

340.22 he devoused the lelias on the fined
ch1: "pretty Lilias, his only child"

265.18 tho if it theem tho and yeth if you
ch3ff: "in 'thpite of hith lithp'" (Puddock)

563.20 What Gipsy Devereux vowed to Lylian
ch4?: "Handsome Captain Devereux!—Gipsy Devereux, as they called him for his clear dark complexion—was talking a few minutes later to Lilias Walsingham."
(wiki: "There is one serious subplot: the ill-starred romance between the alcoholic but romantic rake Captain Devereux and the virtuous Lily Walsingham. Their romance is scuppered when he is accused of "ruining" a young girl and having promised to marry her (he denies the latter, at least). Lily turns down Devereux's offer of marriage, and eventually pines away and dies. Devereux makes attempts to reform himself, but it is too late.")

245.26 You took with the mulligrubs
ch25: (quoting Swift's Polite Conversation) 'What, you are sick of mulligrubs, with eating chopt hay?'

285.13 twalegged poneys
ch35: (of men carrying a sedan-chair) "the two-legged ponies"

111.08 a goodish-sized sheet of letterpaper
ch53: 'The sod just for so much as a good sized sheet of letter-paper might cover, was trod and broken'

245.27 we lack mulsum?
ch56: 'mulsum'

283.10 rakehelly
ch71: "rakehelly" = scoundrel

294.26 thunder and turf
ch77: "breathing turf and thunder"

331.28 when capriole legs covets limbs of a crane
ch86: "the capriole-legged old mahogany table"

246.04 Between the starfort and the thornwood brass castle flambs with mutton candles
ch98: 'His usual path was by the Star Fort, and through the thorn woods'
ch86, ch92: The Brass Castle is Dangerfield's house (mutton candles flare there)

Monday, April 28, 2014

Page 238

Assigned reading (1 par [] plus 158 notes) [secondary] [McH] [*]





FDV: "were drawpairs so want lotteries of ticklets. Will bee all buzzy us a {one another again} minmie for you are pollen yourself. We feel unspeechably thoughtless [...] {over} it all so"



mysteries:

[07:17-09:09]

Sunday, April 27, 2014

Page 237

Assigned reading (2/2 pars [] plus 155 notes) [secondary] [McH] [*]





FDV: "towooerds him, their lord, that they may catchcup in those chalicettes the parryshoots from his pistil, (O my goodness! O my gracious! O my pricelestly preshoes!) as dewyfally as dumbelles they allisten to his elixir. Enchainted, sweet Stainusless, dearer dearest, we herehear thee, salutant Pattren of our unschoold, deliverer of softmissives, send us a wise and letters play. Sweetstaker, we toutes"

2DV: "things {feminite} towooerds him, their lord & stigmatiser, that they may catchcup in these calyzettes those parryshoots from his one {muscalone} pistil, (O my goodmiss! O my graceness {greatness}! O my pricelestly preshoes!) while dewyfally as dumbelles they allisten to his elixir. Enchainted, sweet dear Stainusless, dearer dearest, we herehear aboutobuds thee salutant Pattren of our unschoold, deliverer of softmissives, send us a wise and letters play of all you canceive of from your holy post. Sweetstaker, we toutes "



mysteries:

[05:24-07:17]

[The hesitancy/stutter motif in Finnegans Wake]

stutter [fweet-135]
hesitency [fweet-26] [backstory]
hesitancy [fweet-8]

The alpha male is known by his lack of hesitancy.

The classical style in literature is characterised by a lack of hesitancy. Cf freestyle rap

The young writer betrays hesitancy, as does the aging writer.

This cyclical symmetry, old mirroring young, must be deep in FW's structure... yes? (he asked hesitantly)

Stuttering as a sign of guilt
innocent-sin-guilty-disgrace?-forgiveness?